Vector-Borne Diseases Seminar

3 02 2011

The first in a series of seminars on vector-borne diseases was held on January 31, 2011 at the Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute in Orlando, FL. BioFlorida and Industry colleagues were invited to attend the discussion on ‘Detection, Prevention & Treatment of Vector-Borne Diseases’. With zoonoses comprising about 65-75% of new disease discoveries I was interested in the response to ‘early warning’ technology as a decisively beneficial component of an overall solution for any new disease.

The program focus was planned for mosquito-bred diseases. However, as I had hoped, the broader discussion migrated to public-private collaboration on vector-borne diseases in general. I took an opportunity to suggest to the audience that there is growing support for the idea that a solution should no longer be compartmentalized into discovery, academic research, industry development, etc., but rather a complete discovery-to-consumer effort. Each supporting entity could then be identified and engaged at an appropriate time.  The entire public-private integration could be planned earlier and the steps from R&D to delivery would be more efficient; especially with regard to funding requirements as a whole rather than piece-meal and from many resources with differing timetables.

The group of about 50 participants were mostly from academia, but moving more toward public-private cooperation to deliver solutions was well received. Follow up seminars are planned in the coming months and Global PBS will continue to  be represented.

Advertisements

Actions

Information

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: